Review: Louet Victoria

Christmas of 2006 brought me a Louet Victoria wheel, given to me by my son. I’ve now spent five days treating it as my primary wheel, and putting it to the real-life Abby test. Read on for a comprehensive review.

The Simple Facts

The Louet Victoria, or S95/S96, is the latest wheel from Dutch wheelmaker Louet, whose wheels and other fiber equipment have been well-received over the past several decades by a wide range of fiber artists. Key elements in Louet wheel popularity are modern design and materials, terrific durability, and ease of maintenance. However, some handspinners (including myself) have found Louet wheels to be somewhat limited in versatility for one major reason: they have always been bobbin lead. That changes with the Victoria, a lightweight portable wheel which is also Louet’s first flyer lead / scotch tension offering.

Louet states that Victoria is as of this writing the lightest and most compact portable spinning wheel on the market, an audacious claim but one which appears to be accurate. Lighter than all the competition at about 10 pounds even in the carry bag with all accessories, the Victoria folds up to be slightly taller than the venerable Bosworth Journey Wheel, but also a little thinner. Securely stowed in a well-designed carry bag which can be used as an in-hand tote, tote with shoulder strap, or backpack, the Victoria is a no-brainer to fit in an airline overhead bin, and possibly under the seat in front of you. Victoria’s carry bag secures and pads the wheel and lazy kate and bobbins quite well, and features a capacious exterior pocket which could easily accommodate a number of additional bobbins and several pounds of fiber. If you can carry around a typical laptop bag, you can carry around the Louet Victoria.

As of December 2006, the new Louet wheel comes standard with three drive ratios, 6:1, 10:1, and 14:1; Louet says that a high-speed kit will be available in the first half of 2007, allowing ratios higher than 20:1. Louet’s web site lists the S95/S96 at 3-3.5 kg (6.5-7.5 pounds) with a folded size of 13.5 cm thick, 30 cm wide, and 47.5 cm tall (that’s 5.375 inches thick, 11.875 inches wide, and 18.75 inches tall). The Victoria in its initial sales phase comes with the carry bag, 3 bobbins, and a 2-bobbin lazy kate, and retails for $550 US, although vendors indicate that the price is expected to increase to the $700 US range following the initial round of sales. It is available in beech (S95) or slightly heavier oak (S96).

Louet Victoria from the flyer down

Bobbin Lead? Flyer Lead? What?

Simply put, bobbin lead means that what is driven when you treadle is the bobbin, so the bobbin is the first thing to move, and the flyer (which turns separately from the bobbin) follows after. Braking action is applied to the flyer, often with a leather band across the orifice. On a bobbin lead spinning wheel, a drive band connects the drive wheel and bobbin, causing the bobbin to turn when the drive wheel turns. This type of setup is sometimes called Irish tension.

On a flyer lead spinning wheel, a whorl attached to the flyer is connected via a drive band to the drive wheel, and the flyer is the first thing to move. Braking action is applied to the bobbin, which turns independent of the flyer. This type of setup is often referred to as Scotch tension.

On a flyer lead wheel, it is possible for a spinner to easily reduce the tension, or strength of pull-in and takeup of spun yarn on the bobbin, to near zero, enabling the spinning of extremely fine yarn and short stapled and fine fibers. This very light takeup is much harder, and in some cases impossible, to achieve with bobbin lead. Many handspinners who prefer to spin very fine yarns therefore shy away from bobbin lead wheels, opting instead for flyer lead wheels, whether scotch tension or double drive. This being the case, lace spinners have often rejected Louet wheels simply on the basis of being bobbin lead (though many Louet owners have found ways to reduce the takeup on their wheels and spin yarns that are quite fine).

The Setup, and the Technical Dirt

Nothing about the wrapped present under the Christmas tree said “spinning wheel” to me, even when my family gleefully urged me to shake the present and try to guess what it was. Wrapped in its original shipping box, it weighed under 10 pounds (or under 5 kg), the package was maybe 8 inches (20.32 cm) thick, and nothing rattled or sounded like bobbins or moving parts, at all. Mind you, with the wrapping paper off, the telltale LOUET packaging with details on the wheel on the end, shipped from a fiber shop I know well, were dead giveaways.

Opening the shipping box, out slid the wheel packed securely in its zippered nylon carrying case. Unzipping the top flap and opening it, printed instructions leapt right out at me explaining the sequence in which to unpack it. Held in place by two nylon straps with backpack-style buckles, as well as fitted holes and light padding secured to a flexible but sturdy backplate, it was impressive to see what all fit in the carry case neatly. Following the instructions, I removed a bobbin from its secure holding place, unbuckled the first of two nylon straps, gently pulled a knob that held the wheel in its folded state and swung the back bar with drive wheel and whorl upright, at which point that same knob clicked smoothly into place holding the wheel upright. I unbuckled the second of the nylon straps, lifted the wheel out by the leather loop across the top of the back bar (a carrying handle!) and placed it in front of the chair where I intended to spin, noting with surprise that it was only a little more than knee high, and made my nearby Majacraft Suzie Pro look like a hulking behemoth. I looked in the bag for the flyer, then realized (yes, I went back to the instructions!) it was secured in a nylon bushing under the left treadle.

Victoria flyerThe three-grooved Louet whorl is made from a lightweight metal which appears to be powdercoated black, and is mounted securely at the top of the hinged back bar. At the center of the whorl is a slot into which the flyer shaft fits, aided by a magnetic lock; to remove the flyer for changing bobbins or to pack up the wheel, you hold the whorl steady and pull towards you on the flyer and bobbin, and they simply snap out of place (but don’t forget to watch out for your brake band). The entire flyer comes off, shaft included — this is similar to how the Ashford Joy flyer assembly comes off, for those familiar with that. In lieu of a more traditional mother-of-all and maiden bar, the Victoria has a small wooden piece which extends out from the back bar under where the flyer goes, and it is this piece which houses the scotch tension mechanism. As supplied, the scotch tension setup consists of a long spring at left mounted to a peg, with a monofilament that you then route over the bobbin groove, under a hook at right, and forward to where you insert the tubular tensioning knob into a hole in the aforementioned wooden piece. The flyer operates independent of any friction bearing, similar to Majacraft flyers or, again, the Ashford Joy.

The flyer itself is made from the same wood as the wheel (mine is oak), including the flyer arms. Stationary hooks are placed on either side of the orifice (which is also a lightweight metal with an apparent black powdercoat covering), and flyer hooks are nylon rings with metal loops. Bobbins have end caps made from medium density fiberboard (MDF) with a veneer matching the rest of the wheel (one end grooved for the brake band) which contain nylon bushings, and the core appears to be nylon or plastic.

The drive wheel, the widest part of the entire Victoria, measures a full 14 inches (35.56 cm) in diameter — just a tiny bit larger than the drive wheel on the Suzie Pro, to my surprise. It is also made from MDF with a matching wood veneer, very seamlessly done. It is my opinion that MDF is in many respects functionally superior to solid wood for things like drive wheels, due to its uniformity of weight. However, MDF is not particularly attractive; the veneer solves this problem nicely.

One single footman rod connects to the drive wheel using a nylon cup that snaps on and is secured in place by a nylon ring that you slip down to the end of the cup; you must detach this in order to fold the wheel. It actually detaches easier than it attaches, and it is this piece which I would expect to see wear out and need replacing the soonest — but no guesses how long that might take, and it would depend on how you use the wheel as well.

Full bobbin!The single footman rod connects to the right treadle; a wooden seesaw bar connects the two treadles. Each treadle is hinged near the bottom (where your heel would go) but not all the way at the bottom; this allows for a heel-toe treadling action, or a light touch with the ball of your feet further up the treadle. It is entirely possible and comfortable to operate the wheel using either foot, or both feet. Treadles are placed fairly close together, and are slightly longer and wider than my feet shod in women’s US size 8 (metric/European 38) shoes.

To pack up the wheel, you detach the flyer, remove the bobbin, and place the flyer shaft into the nylon bushing beneath the left treadle, flyer hooks facing up. Pick up the wheel and place it into the carry bag so the feet slip into their little holder spots, secure the first strap over the treadles, and twist on the footman rod to detach it from the drive wheel. Pull out the small knob at the hinged back bar’s base, and fold the back bar down — the knob will snap into place automatically when the wheel is fully closed. Secure the second strap across the wheel, place one bobbin in its elastic loop holder and the lazy kate with two bobbins on it in its spot in the carry case, zip up, and you’re done. Setup and pack-up both take 2-4 minutes tops.

The Road Test

In five days, I spun a range of fibers and types of yarn which I felt would represent a fairly broad spectrum of spinning, though focusing in particular on what has always been the Achilles heel of Louet wheels, extremely fine yarn. Because the highest ratio presently available is 14:1, I excluded cotton from my tests for the time being. I put both spinning and plying to the test, as well as the lazy kate, and specifically looked for idiosyncracies, quirks, and limitations.

Let me start by saying that I am largely a spinner of very fine yarn; I’m also a very fast drafter who likes to spin at very high ratios, even for types of yarn which most people spin at lower ratios. 12:1 is about as low a ratio as I typically spin at, so the Victoria’s default top ratio is on the low end of what I like to spin with personally. I’m also an admitted flyer lead aficionado, and someone who spins for sometimes as much as 10 hours in a day. Lastly, I have bad knees due to a hereditary issue that results in very easily dislocated kneecaps, particularly with uneven fatigue (so I no longer drive stick, run, or spend really long periods of time with single treadle mechanisms).

All three bobbins were equipped with a loop which worked well as a leader to attach a yarn for plying; for spinning though, I prefer a fairly long leader, so I tied a length of other yarn to the loop (with an open loop, so as to be able to replace it easily when/if needed). Threading the leader through the flyer hooks and orifice was a breeze; with the openness of the metal loops in the flyer hooks, and the length of the opening atop the orifice tube, no hook was really necessary at any point. Sliding flyer hooks which are also able to be twisted around on the flyer arms are a major selling point for any wheel in my book; this allows me the most fine-grained control of my wind-on, enabling me to fill bobbins completely while really fine-tuning draw-in as well. Sliding flyer hooks, preferably adjustable in the sense that they can be rotated on the arm, are a personal requirement for me for any production wheel. I also find there are advantages to be had from not needing a hook to thread a flyer and orifice; first of all, no hook to lose, and second of all, no hook to find if you need to rethread it due to a break or what have you.

Boucle on VictoriaThe Victoria’s orifice height is the lowest of any wheel I can recall spinning on! Seated on a typical sofa, the orifice is just barely above knee height. However, it’s angled up slightly, and the orifice tube itself is long. To my surprise, the lower orifice height actually proved beneficial, lengthening my potential drafting range and the distance between my hands and the orifice, compensating more than I anticipated for a top speed slower than is my usual choice.

Expecting that there would be at least a little break-in, I opted to start with a fairly pedestrian yarn: I took about half an ounce of commercial merino top, split it roughly in half, and spun it from the fold into a single that felt comfortable with languid treadling at the medium ratio. I put half on one bobbin, and half on another, and then put those onto the lazy kate / bobbin holder and plied them onto the third. This allowed me to check out each bobbin and give them all a chance to get a bit broken in. Each bobbin had a tiny bit of a tendency to grab the monofilament at first. After verifying there was no abnormal wear on the monofilament, and no definite burrs or anything like that on the bobbins, I simply spun away.

On the initial runs for each bobbin, there was a mild tendency to catch the brake band; however this was gone by the time I had about 75 yards of yarn onto the first, and eliminated with a tiny bit of wax on the second, down in the groove for the brake band. The problem was more marked on the initial plying run; as suggested by the instructions that came with the wheel, I rerouted the brake band so that it included a cross (meaning that the direction of spin was opposed in relation to where the spring on the brake band is located). This did make the scotch tension more responsive; however this particular bobbin also made a little bit of a whirring-scraping noise. Having encountered that before on other wheels, I applied a tiny drop of spinning wheel oil directly to the bobbin groove while plying. I suspect that changing to an all-cotton brake band would also eliminate any such noise. When the monofilament wears out, that’s probably what I’ll replace it with.

The scotch tension knob is pretty sensitive, though it could turn a little more smoothly in its hole, to facilitate minor adjustments. I’d like to give it a little longer to break in than I’ve given it so far; in another week or two, if it doesn’t turn a bit more freely, I may try a tiny bit of beeswax on it.

Treadle action is incredibly smooth and easy; I was able to operate the wheel with ease while sitting in a rocking recliner, without causing myself to rock! By the time I was done plying the first yarn, there was a mild squeak coming from the treadle area. This took me a while to track down; however, to track it down, I picked up the small, lightweight wheel and operated the treadles with the wheel essentially laying in my lap and my ear to it while watching things move. It turned out to be the pin connecting the footman rod connector to the right-hand treadle, rubbing against the wood in the footman rod at one particular point during the stroke. I ran a super-fine emery board through the crevice and applied a single drop of synthetic lubricant (I’m sure beeswax would have worked equally well). This squeak would, I’m sure, have worked itself out in another few days of break-in.

Boucle spun and plied with Louet VictoriaWhen treadling at over 100 treadles per minute — not a speed you’d sustain for long! — I did manage to get some vibration and wobble from the wheel. Short of that, however, nothing — and the wheel did not walk or slide on a hardwood floor at normal speeds, and did very well with being placed on a somewhat uneven surface.

So how does Victoria travel? Well, I packed it up and took it with me over to the in-laws for Christmas dinner, and spun there for a while as well. Since we were also taking presents and part of Christmas dinner, vehicle space was a little limited, and the wheel rode on my lap in its carrying case, outside pocket containing my small carry-around bag (don’t call it a purse! it mostly carries my spindle and fiber!), a pound of Falkland top, and about 3 ounces of fresh sock batt seconds. Setup, spinning, and packing up were completely unobtrusive.

By the time I was done with the second yarn (sock yarn from my own blend), I’d found one more idiosyncracy, which in truth only gave me greater appreciation for the attention to detail Louet put into this wheel. The brake band attaches to the scotch tension knob with a small screw, and the flyer hooks’ nylon rings are 2, maybe 3 mm thick. In one specific position, it is possible to get the nylon ring to touch that screw on the scotch tension knob, making a very quiet clicking sound! This did not interfere with operation at all while spinning, even spinning very fine yarn; and moving the flyer hook or turning the tension knob the tiniest increment eliminated it. This discovery came close on the heels of me concluding that it wasn’t a good idea for me to adjust the scotch tension brake band while the flyer was in motion (ow). Later, packing a bobbin to the max with plied yarn, I did manage to run across the slight clicking again and knock the tension knob loose; a minor surprise, but a total non-issue, something I mention only to illustrate just how carefully fitted this wheel is; you literally could not pack more into the space available, and the engineering and fit and finish are exceptional.

Discovering that, though, caused me to really look closely at the layout of the wheel. Clearances for all moving parts really push the limit of what you can pack into the space available. I wouldn’t have thought that it was possible to get good operation out of something with such tight clearances; in places they are even tighter than the Journey Wheel, which for me sets the standards in “packing a lot of function into a tiny package.” That said, though, you could say one limitation the Victoria will have if used as a primary wheel is that there’ll never be a jumbo flyer; the flyer provided is as large as you could get on there. However, this is not a major limitation, as bobbin capacity is more generous than I’d have expected, being similar to if not greater than that of a standard Ashford bobbin when pushed to the limit, even with bulky novelty yarn wound on pretty loosely.

Victoria lazy kate

Untensioned on the flyer shaft, the bobbins do make a rather annoying squealing sound, which the instructions do mention and explain is normal; they did so as well on an untensioned vertical lazy kate as well as an untensioned horizontal one with metal shafts, but did not do so on my Will Taylor tensioned (also vertical) lazy kate. The bobbin rack/lazy kate supplied with Victoria holds the bobbins only by the ends, and is totally silent. To my surprise despite its light weight, it was also extremely stable and didn’t have a tendency to scoot around, due to good-sized rubber feet. Yarn wound off the bobbins on it very smoothly when plying even at varying speeds such as for the boucle, and the lazy kate didn’t slip even when I wound skeins from it very quickly. Winding one skein, rather than taking the bobbin off and carrying it over near where I usually skein my yarn, or carrying my skeiner to the wheel, I simply carried the Victoria to the skeiner — and imagine my surprise when I realized that the Victoria, set up and with a full bobbin on it, was noticeably lighter in hand than my freestanding Fricke floor skeiner!

How Does It Stack Up To Competition?

Journey Wheel, Louet Victoria, Majacraft Suzie Pro

For usability and scope of capabilities, I would rate it as roughly similar to a Journey Wheel, but lighter, though it takes longer to set up and pack up, and lacks double drive or a single treadle option, and larger-footed spinners may find it cramped in the treadle area as a result, even though it can be worked with only one treadle easily. Ergonomically the wheel is excellent, and extremely low impact, with smoothness and ease of treadle action comparable to most wheels in the $700+ range. It lacks the sheer bobbin capacity and versatility of a Majacraft wheel, but is substantially smaller than most and lighter even than the Gem. Compared to the Lendrum, it’s faster to set up and take down, but not as versatile in terms of speeds, though I found Victoria’s flyer design is a little friendlier. Smaller, lighter, quieter and smoother in operation than the Ashford Joy, bobbin capacity for the Victoria is similar if not larger than Ashford’s standard bobbins, in part due to sliding flyer hooks which enable the spinner to fill the bobbin evenly.

Fine 2-ply yarn spun with VictoriaI spun 6 yarns with equal ease and comfort, encountering real limits only when spinning loose camel down into fine yarn; for my liking when it comes to down fibers, I just want more speed than Victoria can provide right now. I expect the high speed kit will remedy this when it becomes available in 2007. As a longtime critic of bobbin lead, and someone who has ruled out a number of very nice Louet wheels for myself in the past, I can absolutely say those issues do not exist with the Victoria, as evidenced by an 11-gram, 195-yard skein of approximately 7500 ypp 2-ply tussah silk (pictured at left, the finished 2-ply yarn wrapped around the edge of a penny).

The Actual Opinion

Yarn from 5-day test of Louet VictoriaThe bottom line is that I’ll use the heck out of this wheel, and would recommend it as a travel wheel for any spinner, and as a primary wheel for spinners with limited space. I would also rate it highly for spinners for whom ergonomics are at issue. If spinning down fibers or cotton are your primary goals, wait and see on the high speed kit; if super-bulky is your main thing, you might prefer a larger wheel. However, if you’re looking for all-around versatility in a tiny, lightweight package, you can’t go wrong with Louet’s newest wheel, which I also expect to be entirely maintenance-free after break-in, needing nothing more than a very occasional replacement of scotch tension brake band. And if you’re a flyer lead fan or super-fine spinner long disappointed in bobbin lead wheels, this is the wheel you’ve wished Louet would make.

Here are the yarns I spun during my 5-day road test of the Louet Victoria S95/S96:

  • 2-ply white fingering/light sock weight yarn, from commercial merino top: 18 grams / .625 oz, 125 yards — 3200 yards per pound
  • 2-ply pink sock yarn, from Franquemont Fibers sock blend (superwash merino, mixed silks, kid mohair, nylon): 68 grams / 2.375 oz, 370 yards — 2500 ypp
  • 3-ply orange bulky yarn, from Franquemont Fibers Luxury Batt (merino/falkland/tussah silk/firestar nylon): 88 g / 3.125 oz, 205 yards and 68 g / 2.25 oz, 150 yards — 1000 ypp
  • 2-ply green threadweight tussah silk, from Franquemont Fibers “Sea Foam” colourway: 12 g /.42 oz — 7500 ypp
  • Green boucle, Franquemont Fibers luxury single (merino/silk/firestar) with handspun tussah silk first binder and commercial nylon second binder: 18 g / .625 oz — 60 yards, 1500 ypp

For more photos from my 5-day test, including larger, higher-resolution photos, you can take a look at my Louet Victoria Road Test Photo Gallery.

25 thoughts on “Review: Louet Victoria

  1. I enjoyed your review and am glad to find that you like this wheel. You certainly put it through its paces.I have one and have been thoroughly liking it as I learn to spin. I have spun and plyed on it and find I like it more each time I use it. I doubt I will ever spin for ten hours a day but I have spun three to four hours consistently and it just spins on and on quietly and smoothly.

  2. A very thoughtful and thorough review of the Victoria. The higher res photos are a good addition. The resulting skeins showed that you put it through it’s paces. It’s easy to see how wheels multiple. :-)

  3. I love mine, too, and still haven’t gotten over how small it is. I can’t wait to go on a trip!

    Heh. My purse is usually mostly filled with my knitting.

  4. This is the most articulate and comprehensive review of the new Victoria that I have seen *anywhere* on the internet. Louet should be paying you dearly for this!

    Just found your blog recently and I have become an avid fan of your writing Thanks for a great read!

    Happy 2007~

  5. I took mine on a plane. It doesn’t fit under the seat in front. But it does fit over head. Have you had trouble with the spring?

  6. It’s unfortunate that people don’t understand the capablities of the Louet S-10. I spin cotton on mine. The only changes needed are the fat core bobbins and flipping the brake band off. The wheel is much less limited than my Pipy which is suited only for fine yarns. I would miss my 8 ounce bobbins. I have to confess that it would be nice to have a Wool-E winder for it, so I wouldn’t have to mess with the hooks all the time.

  7. I recieved my own Victoria last week and haven’t done much on it yet but the double treadles are going to take some getting used to,however I love it and although I found your review after the purchase, it has been a wonderful resource! Thank you!!!

  8. Wow what a great review. I liked it at SOAR but your information is wonderful.

    Linda Shelhamer
    Billings, MT

  9. Thank you for your very thoughtful and thorough review of this wheel. I just got mine and tested it out for the first time this weekend. I’m wondering if i’m doing something wrong or if there’s just a learning curve with this wheel because it’s a little challenging to treadle as smoothly as I can on my Lendrum: frankly, it’s a bit herky-jerky, and I don’t know if it’s the wheel, or more likely, the person driving the wheel.

  10. Great review! I bought my Victoria after reading your review. Thanks! I’m loving mine.

    I do wonder why you call this a bobbin lead wheel, though. The driveband goes around the wheel & the flyer whorl, not the bobbin (although the flyer comes out of the whorl.) I’d call it a flyer lead based on what I read in Aldon Amos’s book.

    Mary

  11. Hi Mary,

    I don’t call the Victoria a bobbin lead wheel; it’s the other Louets which are bobbin led. The Victoria, unlike the other Louets except perhaps the S-45 (which I have not had a chance to test, and hear conflicting things about from dealers) is a flyer lead single drive wheel using scotch tension.

    –Abby, off to doublecheck and re-proofread in case she missed a typo or something….

  12. Dear Abby, Thank you for an excellent review, much better than the adds disguised as reviews in various magazines.

  13. Abby, I read your review of this wheel when you first wrote it and thought it was a very nice sounding little wheel. I just purchased one this past weekend at the fiber festival at the Farm Park in Eastlake, Ohio. I already have a Lendrum DT and a Journey Wheel, but wanted one that would be a little easier to travel with. I spun up about 4 oz. of a wool blend from the Wooly Knobb guys and am now spinning up some thin sock yarn. I really am impressed with this wheel and wanted to thank you for your great review. I have learned a lot by reading your website and your comments on the spindlers list on Yahoo. Thanks for all your research and interesting writing that you do!

  14. I have just finished a spinning class and I was able to try out several wheels and am now very confused. I thought I would like the Victoria but it had problems at the shop, the sliding hooks were loose. I enjoy this site I came across it through KR. I will try the Victoria again.

  15. Many thanks for this superb – best ever – review of a spinning wheel.

    Would you recommend a woolee winder for the Victoria or the Schachet Matchless?

    NJG

  16. Hi Abby — I just purchased a Louet Victoria, my first spinning wheel (ever)! I have a few questions for you that I’m hoping you can help me with. First of all, I broke my brake band already. I have no idea how or why this happened but it did and I’m wondering how the band can be replaced as you mentioned it could in your review. Can you explain this? Does the whole tension knob have to be replaced? If not, how do you get the band out of the knob? My band appears to be attached with some sort of pin and doesn’t appear to be replaceable, although I could be wrong. Also, my sliding hooks on my flyer don’t stay put. They move up and down the flyer arms which causes my yarn to wind improperly on the bobbin. Am I doing something wrong? And finally, my legs are getting tired from spinning — is this normal or do I maybe have my tension too high? I had my tension set fairly high because the bobbin was moving too much and wouldn’t draw my yarn up and also because it looked like my yarn was overspun.

    Hoping you can help and looking forward to your response! Thanks.

  17. Thank you so much for your review. I just purchased the Victoria based on your comments. I have attended my last conference/workshop with a prearranged rented wheel because my Schacht is too large or heavy to store in the overhead bin. I fly often to different spinning events and can’t wait to travel with my own wheel. Thanks again. Toni

  18. Thank you for this review. I have always been a fan of Louet wheels because they are powerhouse wheels and with a little tweaking of parts will spin anything. They are also well-built and virtually indestructible. I loved my S10, but sold it to help buy Victoria. I take my wheels everywhere, even little league games so portability was important. While I spin usually thick yarns ( I own Icelandics and spin Lopi), I really am not able to spin thick with this wheel. I think some of the things other people have discussed as concerns about this wheel may be due, in part to spinning thicker yarns. I, too have had bands break, and the hooks on the flier do come loose.
    I think for thinner yarns, this wheel is the cat’s pajama’s, but for new spinners, or folks who just spin thicker yarns, the wheel is just not made for this. I contacted Jan at Louet.com and he has been very helpful, so if anyone is having some trouble, they are happy to help spinners be more comfortable and content with Victoria. Thanks again for this review, it was helpful to me.
    Joanne

  19. I just got my Victoria wheel and love the way it feels, but there is a considerable wobble in the wheel and I’m wondering if this is “normal” or not. It wobbles from about 1/8 to 1/4 inch. I live in a remote area and don’t have a store near by to go to to compare it with other wheels.

    Thanks,
    Janene

  20. Thank you so much, just the info I needed. My new Victoria comes on Tuesday and I sold my Joy within 1 day

  21. Thanks so much for this review’s details. I am a complete novice, but I want to learn to spin. I have the Louet Victoria, and I need help in setting up the brake system… the instruction photos were not clear at all. Would you have a photo of how to set it up?

    -Perry-

  22. I have an old S10, the only problem I have with it is that it dosnt treadle as easily as my knees would like. I actually spin barefoot or sock footed, and use both feet on the one pedal.
    My plans were to save up and get a Matchless, Id still like to do that, but the little victoria is appealing to me more and more. I like spinning fine, ( well sock to sport wt( which is fine for me) and the size, wieght and portability of the victoria suit me well too. I still would keep the s10, its wonderful for plying and for larger yarn, should I decide to spin larger.
    Im very happy to learn it is not stressful to the knees, and that I can use it with just one pedel, to rest the other knee. I wasnt sure if my wide feet would fit the pedels, but I think they will.
    Thank you for the information in this reveiw.
    Beth

  23. enjoyed reading this thorough account of the Louet Victoria s96. I am trying to decide between this wheel and a Kromski Sonata. I think I would like more versatility (Jumbo flyers and all that) but I am very petite and ergonomics is very important to me. Not sure what to do but this review really helped me think about the differences! Do you have a review about Kromskis? I hope you will write 1-on-1 compare and contrast reviews.

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